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Library Subject Guides

5. Publish & Share: ORCID

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ORCiD


Four Steps:

Registering an ORCID account, whether you have an account or not, and verifying it with Canterbury is done through the ORCID hub.

  1. Go to the ORCID Hub, and log in with the link at the top right.
  2. Sign in to Tuakiri (the NZ academic sign on system) to ensure you are associated with Canterbury University
  3. Sign in to ORCID with your ID, or register with a new account
  4. It will bounce you back to the ORCID hub, with your verification details.

When you first connect to the Hub you will be taken to your ORCID record, or asked to create one. Once in your ORCID record you will receive clear communication that your organisation is asking permission to connect to your ORCID record to update it. You will be given the ability to either authorise or deny that request. If you deny it, the Hub will give you another opportunity to grant permission, give a lesser permission level (read only) or deny access to your ORCID completely. If you opt to give your organisation a lesser permission level to your ORCID record (read only) and later change your mind to grant a higher permission level (read and write to your ORCID record) simply revisit the Hub by clicking on the Hub link. This will give you the option to change the access permissions for your organisation. If you are unsure of what to do, you can contact anton.angelo@canterbury.ac.nz or orcid@royalsociety.org.nz

 

 

 

Why should I connect my ORCID iD to the University of Canterbury using the NZ ORCID Hub?

Anyone can create an ORCID iD and claim that they are a student or staff member at the University of Canterbury. When you connect your ORCID iD to the University of Canterbury via the NZ ORCID Hub, the University of Canterbury receives your verified ORCID iD, so they can be sure that you are in control of that ORCID iD. At the same time, the University of Canterbury will post your employment or educational information to your ORCID record; the source of that data will be clearly marked as the University of Canterbury on your ORCID record – a more reliable source of information than if you add it yourself, as a researcher or student. This helps to promote trust in the research system. 

ORCID provides you, as a researcher, with a unique, 16-digit ID that you keep throughout your career to connect you with your research. Your name is not necessarily unique to you, and you may use variations of your name (Smith, J; John Andrew Smith; J.A. Smith, Smith, J.A. etc.) in your work. For this reason, it can be difficult for publishers, funders, librarians and indexing companies, as well as other researchers, to pair you with your research work. People with similar names may be working in the same field, and it can be difficult to attribute work to the correct person. Additionally, people may change their names if they marry, or may use names formatted in another alphabet; again, this makes it difficult to match a piece of work to the correct researcher. ORCID aims to solve this problem by giving you a unique identifier that distinguishes you from everyone else in the world. It is a record of your research activities, contributions, and outputs. You own the record and are in control of what is publicly visible or private. The unique benefit of ORCID is that it can be ‘plumbed in’ to other systems such as a publisher’s manuscript or peer review submission system, a funder’s application system or your organisation’s research management system. You can give these parties permission to read information from your record and write information directly to your ORCID record in order to exchange data between the two systems; this will save you time. For example, research funders can add grants that you’ve been awarded; your employer – such as the University of Canterbury can assert that you work for them, and a publisher can add your publications or peer review activities. All of this helps keep your record up to date without any extra input from you. Some funders and publishers are now mandating ORCID iDs for grant applications and for publication in certain journals. Whenever you see the green ORCID iD icon , you know that this refers to a person’s ORCID iD. 

Your ORCID iD belongs to you. Only you can create your ORCID iD, and you are in control of who reads from or writes information to it. Anyone wanting to connect their system to your ORCID iD must ask your permission for either one-off access or long-term access until you revoke it, which you can do at any time in your ORCID account settings.

Visibility of data in your ORCID record is at an item-by-item rather than an all-or-nothing basis. You can set the default visibility of new data added to your record by you or by other systems to which you have given permission, and in some sections, such as works, you can edit the visibility of some or all items in the section in bulk. ORCID iDs themselves are always publicly visible. A public ORCID record, for example, at https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1825-0097, shows all public information on the record. The minimum information that is publicly available is the 16 digit ORCID number. Anything more than that – including the name on the record – is only visible to the public at the ORCID iD owner’s discretion.

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ORCID and Privacy

Your ORCID iD belongs to you. Only you can create your ORCID iD, and you are in control of who reads from or writes information to it. Anyone wanting to connect their system to your ORCID iD must ask your permission for either one-off access or long-term access until you revoke it, which you can do at any time in your ORCID account settings.

Visibility of data in your ORCID record is at an item-by-item rather than an all-or-nothing basis. You can set the default visibility of new data added to your record by you or by other systems to which you have given permission, and in some sections, such as works, you can edit the visibility of some or all items in the section in bulk. ORCID iDs themselves are always publicly visible. A public ORCID record, for example, at https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1825-0097, shows all public information on the record. The minimum information that is publicly available is the 16 digit ORCID number. Anything more than that – including the name on the record – is only visible to the public at the ORCID iD owner’s discretion.

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